Is Greenpoint ‘Just Green Enough’?

by GWAPP on

Checkout Next City’s piece, Pretty Park, Affordable Rent: Making Neighborhoods “Just Green Enough” that examines the paradox of environmental gentrification.

A growing body of academic literature examines a paradox: Low-income communities tend to suffer from various kinds of environmental injustice, including shortage of green space. But when these concerns are addressed — the power plant closes, a park opens — the neighborhood becomes more desirable, often kickstarting a process of so-called “environmental gentrification.”

Most interestingly, the author talks about DePaul University professor, Winifred Curran’s case study of Greenpoint and how Greenpoint attempts this “careful balancing act.”

Read the complete Next City article, Pretty Park, Affordable Rent: Making Neighborhoods “Just Green Enough”.

Listen or view Curran’s lecture, Just Green Enough: Contesting Environmental Gentrification.

Leave your thoughts on environmental gentrification in the comments!

GWAPP

GWAPP

The Greenpoint Waterfront Association for Parks & Planning, Inc. ("GWAPP") is a not-for-profit group, 501(c)(3), comprised of individuals, community organizations, religious institutions, and concerned citizens from the Greenpoint-Williamsburg communities dedicated to the development of parks and public access on the Greenpoint waterfront.
  • b commented:

    The proposed developments for northern Greenpoint will introduce about 6,000 dwelling units, as many as 15,000 people (NOT included in the original FEIS chapter on transportation) and will grace the area with a meager 5 acres of open space, rather than the CEQR recommended 2.5 acres per 1,000 residents, ie ~ 37.5 acres of open space.

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  • b commented:

    Truly higher sustainable standards should be perfectly aligned with affodability.

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